Monday, May 28, 2012

Impossible Conversations


People have been arguing what fashion is since the word was invented., It's a business, an art form, self-expression, etc, etc. It's not like it matters much, once you saw the "Schiaparelli and Prada: Impossible Conversations" exhibit going on at the Costume Institute. Ever since I'd heard the news back in October or something I've been laying on the floor and crying and playing The Hunger Games Adventure because Schiaparelli and Prada are two of my favourite female designers. They have revolutionized fashion with quirky ideas like shoe-hats and skirts covered in lip prints. Talk about eccentric


The two designers, besides both being Italian and females, have extremely radical aesthetics. The exhibition, comparing and contrasting the owrks of Schiaparelli and Prada, categorizes their work in categories such as "Ugly Chic," "The Surreal Body" and "Waist Up/Waist Down." Bit too redundant for my taste, because last time I checked we don't need 3 categories with "chic" in it("Hard Chic" and "Naif Chic") What do "hard chic" and "naif chic" suppose to mean, anyway? Another interesting aspect of the exhibition is that there are snippets of videos, eavesdropping on the impossible conversations of the two.


Elsa Schiaparelli was one of the major fashion players in the 1930s. Some people who had bitchy cat fights with her(ahem, Coco Chanel) calls her the "Italian who makes clothes." Others call Elsa an innovative visionaire. Either way, she was one of the main designers who used surrealism — putting things at weird places to make it look different — in her work. Resulting products are the Shoe Hat and the Lobster Dress. Avant-garde before her times. Pretty sure that if Elsa is still designing today she would have heel-less shoes and cage-like dresses in her collections. After all, this is the woman who designed jackets with doll hands as belts, glowing brooches and plastic necklaces with metal insects. Bad taste or not, you have to admit that she got guts.


Miuccia Prada, on the other hand, is a completely different story. She inherited her grandpa's Italian luggage company in the late 70's and started designing clothes in the late 80's. She had never study fashion history, though she did bought a lot of vintage clothes. Being a feminist, Miuccia at first felt uncomfortable working in an industry that tells women they are not flawless or perfect. But luckily for us, she eventually found ways to turn her collections into armors. My favourites? Those paillette dresses and coats from fall 2011 and everything embroidered-and-studded from fall 2009.


Other their aesthetics, there are tons of striking similarities between Elsa and Miuccia's collections. Look at the Prada skirt with bugs all over it from fall 1999. Now look at this Schiaparelli necklace crawling with bugs. Eureka! Alas! Did you see it? No? How about now? Still not convinced? Alright, you blundering idiot, now look at how both designers experiment with a myriad of patterns and fabrics. Oh, and add bold colours to the list(Schiaparelli's shocking pink, ring any bell?) If you still don't see it, just go to the exhibition. Or look at it online. Whatever. Then come back and tell me what you think.


6 comments :

  1. Yes, yes, I see the similarities on the last post, I aint an idiot haha. I love Prada. Mhhm.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Miuccia Prada is genius, Prada collections just get better every season.

      Delete
  2. Hi, I really enjoy reading your comments on Fashiongonerogue.com, that's why I wanted to see your blog. Nice work, and this post is really good - I wanted to go to the exhibition too, but I just can't :(! I'm italian and totally in love with Miuccia Prada and Elsa Schiaparelli.
    I have a (bilingual) blog too, take a look at it if you want :) http://virna-ogniricciouncapriccio.blogspot.com/

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. To be honest, I thought my comments are annoying since I basically put my two cents on everything. Aw, sucks that you can't go. Sometimes I just wish that all museums can rotate exhibitions so everyone can go to the ones they want.

      Delete
  3. This comment has been removed by the author.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Very cool pictures! I really enjoyed reading your post as well:)
    xo,
    www.abitofsass.blogspot.com

    ReplyDelete